Droning on from Obama to Trump

The deployment of unmanned aerial drones by the United States military and C.I.A. to execute alleged enemies of the U.S. is unethical, unconstitutional, and undermines its credibility as a source of global leadership, justice, and integrity. These drone missions threaten relations with international allies and must cease if the United States is to remain a respected leader in the global war on terror.

The use of unmanned combat aerial vehicles, known colloquially under the sinister guise of ‘drones,’ has more than tripled under the Obama administration. While no president wants to be responsible for the deaths of American soldiers, the unmanned drones that have replaced on-the-ground troops in many areas are neither capable of informed wartime decision-making nor precise execution. The result is that one in three people killed by a U.S. drone in Pakistan has been a civilian–a staggeringly high percentage of innocent victims from the military leading the so-called fight against terrorism.

This practice is bad for the countries with which the United States collaborates and is equally bad for the U.S. Drone attacks fuel anti-American sentiment and spark distrust for local governments and their law enforcement efforts. Deadly suicide bombings have increased following drone attacks, while the imprecise nature of the execution attempts has made their success questionable at best. Taliban leader Hakimullah Mehsud, for example, was reportedly killed multiple times by drone attacks due to the misinformation and inexactitude that prevails among drone operations.

The use of unmanned drones also marginalizes the role of United States soldiers. In many instances, Special Forces personnel are better equipped to deal with the available intelligence and unconventional war tactics in Pakistan, Afghanistan, Libya, and Iraq. Instead, they are replaced by remote control devices, which can neither react to immediate changes in theater nor make informed judgments during the course of the mission. While soldiers commit their lives to rigorous training and sacrifice, drone missions often rely on brute force, sloppily delivered and resulting in the collateral deaths of innocent civilians.

The fallout from drone executions has marred United States foreign policy among its allies. United Nations special rapporteur on extrajudicial killings, Philip Alston delivered a harsh judgment on drone attacks saying they present a “risk of developing a Playstation mentality to killing.” When it comes to the stress placed on servicemen and women piloting, the New York Times reports that drone pilots suffer the same PTDS and stress-related depression as soldiers on the ground.  Meanwhile, Pakistan, the country in which the majority of attacks are taking place, has publicly objected to the executions despite their complicity.

For his part, president-elect Donald Trump has vowed to continue using drones to execute alleged terrorists. Coupled with the rampant Islamophobia that characterized the rhetoric of his campaign, drone expert Jameel Jaffer fears the outlook is bleak without a significant public backlash against use of combat drones in the Middle East.

Unmanned drone killings are neither ethical nor effective and are jeopardizing the status of the United States as a credible world leader in the global fight against terrorism. In order to salvage the damage done by these machines, the U.S. must significantly reduce its use of unmanned drones in combat roles and begin working with its few remaining allies in the Middle East to rebuild the trust it has lost from the terror its drones have inflicted.

– Tyler

 

 

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